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notingDavid member Inspired by David alerted me to an emotive and heartfelt post by Jenny at fansofdavid.com. If you haven’t read it, please do yourself the favor, then come back and finish reading here.

Josie and I have talked privately about the notion of “losing” David to the wider world as his musical accomplishments mount, his fame grows, and the rest of the planet begins to appreciate what a truly unique and magnificent talent he is. I agree with Jenny that these times, this year, will soon be thought of by the Original Archies Coalition as a precious and even quaint period, a moment when David’s enormous appeal was appreciated by a kind of extended family, one built by virtual alliances through digital communications and powered by sensitive hearts that were opened by one remarkable young man. I have written early and often of my belief in David’s potential to walk shoulder-to-shoulder with the most revered and influential performers in American history; to be one of the true greats. We will, in a sense, and to a degree, sacrifice him to the multitudes as this becomes a reality. He will no longer be ours alone. But I’m not so sure that this will feel like a loss.

Since the end of the competition, the nature of the OAC has been to evangelize, to proselytize, to act as an extended organization of Team David in order to leverage his chances for success in the marketplace. Activities and initiatives ranging from gifting and downloads to radio station requests and reviewer responses are undertaken to champion David to those poor souls who haven’t yet felt the connection. They will. But why do we do it? Aren’t these the very efforts that will result in our losing that special association with David and with each other as his renown inevitably grows?

I think there are three main reasons why the OAC is so determined to act on David’s behalf and bring him the wider audience he so richly deserves. First, we obviously want to share in David’s accomplishments, to feel the vicarious thrill of success and achievement, and to know that we may in some small way be part of helping it happen. Second, it is natural to want to share with others the joy of discovery and the depth of feeling we experience from David. It’s a gregarious impulse, one that cannot help but generate good in the world. But I think the most important reason the OAC is so determined to work and sacrifice for David is a fundamental knowledge and understanding that no matter what we do, we will never be able to return to David what he has given to us.

With his voice, in his song, through his music, and by his very presence, David touches a profound and universal chord of love in each and every one of us. The beauty of this gift is that it is, by its very nature, eternal, limitless. That’s why it is so powerful and sublime, why it causes people to weep spontaneously. Greater numbers of souls being touched by David’s heart will not diminish his availability or his proximity to us but will, on the contrary, magnify it. A world with more David Archuleta will be a better world.

The advantage that the OAC has will be the one that it will always have: the privilege of having seen the star at the birth, of having been in the presence of the light and bestowing blessings when the adoration was intimate. We will all have private memories and stories, and they will be forever ours; early, original threads woven into the fabric of what will almost certainly be a large, rich tapestry of a life and career. Giving David over to the masses will not lessen our relationship with him, it will strengthen his relationship to all.